Paramedicine

Paramedicine Introduction

The Paramedicine program prepares students to provide advanced emergency medical care for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. This individual possesses the complex knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. Paramedics function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. Paramedics perform interventions with the basic and advanced equipment typically found on an ambulance. The Paramedic is a link from the scene into the health care system. The Paramedicine diploma program prepares students for employment in paramedic positions in today's health services field. The Paramedic diploma program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills from the EMT/EMT-I 1985/AEMT levels to a paramedic level. Successful completion of the program allows the graduate to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) Paramedic certification examination and apply for Georgia licensure with the State Office of Emergency Medical Service and Trauma (SOEMST) as a paramedic. Criminal background checks and drug screens may be required based on the requirements for participation in clinical experiences. 

Program Goal

To prepare competent entry - level Paramedics in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains with or without exit points at the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician and/or Emergency Medical Technician, and/or Emergency Medical Responder levels.

Average Program Outcomes

Paramedicine Program Outcomes

Licensure Pass Rates for FY 2017                   (July 1, 2016 - June 30, 2017)                 

Number of Students Who Took A Licensure Exam

Number of Students Who Passed A Licensure Exam

Percent Who Passed A Licensure Exam

EMH1 Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT)

6

4

67%

EMJ1 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)

24

17

71%

EP12 EMS Professions

19

11

58%

PT12 Paramedicine

4

2

50%

PT13 Paramedicine

2

0

0%

FY 2017 Job Placement Rate  100%

AY 2017 Retention Rate  52.6%

Occupational Trends

Employment of emergency medical technicians and paramedics is expected to grow 9 percent between 2008 and 2018, which is about as fast as the average for all occupations. Growth in this occupation is due in large part to increasing call volume due to aging population. As a large segment of the population(aging members of the baby boom generation)becomes more likely to have medical emergencies, demand will increase for EMTs and paramedics. In addition, the time that EMTs and paramedics must spend with each patient is increasing as emergency departments across the country are experiencing overcrowding. As a result, when an ambulance arrives, it takes longer to transfer the patient from the care of the EMTs and paramedics to the staff of the emergency department. In addition, some emergency departments divert ambulances to other hospitals when they are too busy to take on new patients. As a result, ambulances may not be able to go to the nearest hospital, which increases the amount of time spent in transit. Both these factors result in EMTs and paramedics spending more time with each patient, which means more workers are needed to meet demand. EMTs and paramedics held about 210,700 jobs in 2008. Most career EMTs and paramedics work in metropolitan areas. Volunteer EMTs and paramedics are more common in small cities, towns, and rural areas. These individuals volunteer for fire departments, emergency medical services, or hospitals and may respond to only a few calls per month. Paid EMTs and paramedics were employed in a number of industries. About 45 percent worked as employees of ambulance services. About 29 percent worked in local government. Another 20 percent worked in hospitals. 

Education Programs

The most advanced level of training for emergency medical services professional paramedic. At this level, the caregiver receives training in anatomy and physiology as well as advanced medical skills. Most commonly, the training is conducted in community colleges and technical schools and may result in an associates degree. These programs may take up to one to two years. Such education prepares the graduate to take the NREMT examination to become certified as a paramedic. Extensive related coursework and clinical and field experience is required. Refresher courses and continuing education are available for EMTs and paramedics at all levels.

Job/Career Description

Paramedics provide more extensive pre-hospital care than do EMTs. In addition to carrying out the procedures of the other levels, paramedics administer medications orally and intravenously, interpret electrocardiograms (EKGs), perform endotracheal intubations, and use monitors and other complex equipment. However, like the AEMT level, what paramedics are permitted to do varies by State. EMTs and paramedics work both indoors and out, in all types of weather. They are required to do considerable kneeling, bending, and heavy lifting. These workers are at a higher risk for contracting illnesses or experiencing injuries on the job than workers in other occupations. They risk noise-induced hearing loss from sirens and back injuries from lifting patients. In addition, EMTs and paramedics may be exposed to communicable diseases, such as hepatitis-B and AIDS, as well as to violence from mentally unstable or combative patients. The work is not only physically strenuous but can be stressful, sometimes involving life-or-death situations and suffering patients. Nonetheless, many people find the work exciting and challenging and enjoy the opportunity to help others. These workers experienced a larger than average number of work-related injuries or illnesses Many EMTs and paramedics are required to work more than 40 hours a week. Because emergency services function 24 hours a day, EMTs and paramedics may have irregular working hours. All 50 States require EMTs and Paramedics to be licensed, but the levels and titles vary from State to State. In most States and the District of Columbia certification by the NREMT is required at some or all levels. Some States administer their own certification examination or provide the option of taking either the NREMT or State examination. In most States, licensure renewal is required every two to three years and generally, EMTs and paramedics must take refresher training courses or complete continuing education requirements. 

Employment Trends

EMTs and paramedics held about 210,700 jobs in 2008. Most career EMTs and paramedics work in metropolitan areas. Volunteer EMTs and paramedics are more common in small cities, towns, and rural areas. These individuals volunteer for fire departments, emergency medical services, or hospitals and may respond to only a few calls per month. Paid EMTs and paramedics were employed in a number of industries. About 45 percent worked as employees of ambulance services. About 29 percent worked in local government. Another 20 percent worked in hospitals.

Credentials You Can Earn

Paramedicine

Gainful Employment Information

Gainful Employment Disclosure

Degree

Paramedicine

The Paramedicine applied associate in science degree program prepares students to provide advanced emergency medical care for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. This individual possesses the complex knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. Paramedics function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. Paramedics perform interventions with the basic and advanced equipment typically found on an ambulance. The Paramedic is a link from the scene into the health care system. The Paramedicine degree program prepares students for employment in paramedic positions in today's health services field. The Paramedic degree program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills from the EMT/EMT-I 1985/AEMT levels to a paramedic level. Successful completion of the program allows the graduate to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) Paramedic certification examination and apply for Georgia licensure with the State Office of Emergency Medical Service and Trauma (SOEMST) as a paramedic. Criminal background checks and drug screens may be required based on the requirements for participation in clinical experiences. 


Diploma

Paramedicine

The Paramedicine diploma program prepares students to provide advanced emergency medical care for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. This individual possesses the complex knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. Paramedics function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. Paramedics perform interventions with the basic and advanced equipment typically found on an ambulance. The Paramedic is a link from the scene into the health care system. The Paramedicine diploma program prepares students for employment in paramedic positions in today's health services field. The Paramedic diploma program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills from the EMT/EMT-I 1985/AEMT levels to a paramedic level. Successful completion of the program allows the graduate to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) Paramedic certification examination and apply for Georgia licensure with the State Office of Emergency Medical Service and Trauma (SOEMST) as a paramedic. Criminal background checks and drug screens may be required based on the requirements for participation in clinical experiences.


Course Catalog

Learn more about our Paramedicine programs.

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Career Opportunities

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Charles Hill

Program Director and Instructor

Charles Hill of Cleveland has been involved in emergency medical services throughout his career even while on active duty with the US Navy.  Acquiring credentials including Fire Fighter and Emergency Medical Technician certification and the Paramedic Diploma from North Georgia Tech, he completed a BA in Communications from Ashford University in Iowa in 2011. Mr. Hill serves as instructor and program director for NGTC’s Emergency Medical Programs.  Contact:  chill@northgatech.edu.


Brenton (Brent) Birr

Instructor


Farilyn Rearden

Health Care Science Specialist


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